Kazuyoshi Miura: Proving age is indeed just a number

Kazuyoshi Miura: Proving age is indeed just a number

In the modern game, a player is described as being in the twilight years of their career as soon as they reach the other side of 30. For Kazuyoshi Miura, he was reaching that stage in the late 1990s – so it’s rather incredible to discover the Japanese striker is still playing professional football today.

In fact, Miura recently signed a new contract with his Japanese second division club Yokohama FC – despite being 51-years-old.

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Jakub Blaszczykowski: Loyalty above all else in a modern game ran by money

Jakub Blaszczykowski: Loyalty above all else in a modern game ran by money

Many players speak about their loyalty to their boyhood clubs, and support them as passionately as the fans of those teams do. However, few have probably ever gone as far as Borussia Dortmund winger Jakub Blaszczykowski in order to help one of the sides that helped create his football career.

Having joined Wisla Krakow back in 2004 as a late teen, after previously playing in the Polish fourth division, Blaszczykowski spent two and a half years with the club – making 67 appearances in all competitions in that time.

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Football’s ‘cantera’ policy: The last bastions of homegrown talent?

Football’s ‘cantera’ policy: The last bastions of homegrown talent?

The modern game has become a truly international spectacle, especially at the highest levels, with top teams featuring the best athletes from across the globe. Some sides may field full teams that do not feature any players of the nationality of their home country.

However, that’s not the case for all teams.

Across the world’s top divisions, there are a very small handful of clubs actively combating this move away from homegrown, domestic talent. They have chosen to impose voluntary restrictions on the players they can field and sign.

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Why Uefa’s Europa League 2 could have been something great, but won’t be

Why Uefa’s Europa League 2 could have been something great, but won’t be

When talk first came about of a third European tournament being introduced by Uefa, it piqued my interest. Sure, logistically, it sounded like a nightmare, but as a Newcastle United fan, the idea of an Intertoto Cup for us smaller sides – but that actually counted for something – was kind of appealing.

Instead, what we’ve now discovered, is that the Uefa Europa League 2 – working title – is effectively a way to stop the larger clubs in Europe being occasionally embarrassed by teams from less well-established federations.

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Is it time to lift Fifa’s ban on female footballers playing in male leagues?

Is it time to lift Fifa’s ban on female footballers playing in male leagues?

It’s not a fact that too many people realise, since it doesn’t come up often, but Fifa in essence banned female footballers from ever playing in male football leagues above junior level.

In a time of supposed inclusivity, and when more and more is being done to promote and improve women’s football and its standards, surely this arbitrary ruling just stands in the way of that.

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